Connexion  •  M’enregistrer

Artillerie de la seconde guerre mondiale

Une question sur un blindé, une arme, du matériel, un canon, un véhicule, une locomotive de la seconde guerre mondiale?
C'est ici.
MODERATEUR: Marc_91

Artillerie de la seconde guerre mondiale

Nouveau message Post Numéro: 1  Nouveau message de Tomcat  Nouveau message 12 Juil 2017, 10:32

Ci-joint un lien vers un article intéressant (en anglais) sur l'innovation de l'artillerie pendant la seconde guerre mondiale:

https://owlcation.com/humanities/Artill ... ns-in-WWII

Ce fil peut être l'occasion de débattre des spécificités de l'artillerie des différents protagonistes et de son impact lors de différentes batailles...

vétéran
vétéran

 
Messages: 722
Inscription: 16 Avr 2015, 14:16
Région: midi-pyrennées
Pays: france

Voir le Blog de Tomcat : cliquez ici


Re: Artillerie de la seconde guerre mondiale

Nouveau message Post Numéro: 2  Nouveau message de Prosper Vandenbroucke  Nouveau message 12 Juil 2017, 10:57

Grand merci pour le lien, Olivier
L'Union fait la force -- Eendracht maakt macht

Image
http://www.freebelgians.be

Administrateur Principal
Administrateur Principal

Avatar de l’utilisateur
 
Messages: 65908
Inscription: 02 Fév 2003, 20:09
Localisation: Braine le Comte - Belgique
Région: Hainaut
Pays: Belgique

Voir le Blog de Prosper Vandenbroucke : cliquez ici


Re: Artillerie de la seconde guerre mondiale

Nouveau message Post Numéro: 3  Nouveau message de Dog Red  Nouveau message 12 Juil 2017, 11:13

Merci Olivier
Je commençais presque à m'inquiéter de ton long silence :?
« Les gens pensaient que je portais mes grenades telles une posture d’acteur. Ce n’était pas correct. Elles étaient purement utilitaires. Plus d’une fois en Europe et Corée, des hommes en difficulté trouvèrent le salut à coups de grenades »

General Matthew B. RIDGWAY, XVIII US Airborne Corps Commander, Ardennes 1944

modérateur
modérateur

Avatar de l’utilisateur
 
Messages: 8180
Inscription: 11 Mar 2014, 22:31
Région: Hainaut
Pays: Belgique

Voir le Blog de Dog Red : cliquez ici


Re: Artillerie de la seconde guerre mondiale

Nouveau message Post Numéro: 4  Nouveau message de Tomcat  Nouveau message 12 Juil 2017, 14:30

Sur la question des différences entre les différents systèmes d'artillerie et lequel était le meilleur, j'ai noté 2 réponses intéressantes sur ce site https://www.quora.com/Who-had-the-best- ... rld-War-II

Celui-ci donne des arguments en faveur des anglais:

The British arty system (also used by Canada, Aust, NZ & S Africa - not sure if the Brits managed to convince the Polish corps to do the right thing!) was without doubt the most effective artillery system, although the Soviets had a vast artillery arm and size has its own quality.

The key characteristics that made the British system best were:

1. The more senior officers of a battery were at the front with the supported arm (armour, infantry). This meant they gave orders to their batteries (not requests for fire like the US) to ensure that arty fire met the needs of the supported arm - they weren't being second guessed by someone to the rear. Captain observers, reasonably experienced officers, were also better able to establish good relationships with company and squadron commanders they were supporting and apply firepower to meet their needs. Air OPs were normally authorised to order fire to a divisional artillery. It also ensured that calls for fire got a very quick response, ie none of the 'liaison officer' nonsense.

2. Battery commanders of DS btys (majors) were with the supported battalion/regt commanders, influencing their planning to ensure the best and most appropriate use of artillery support. DS regt CO's accompanied the infantry/armd bde comd and provided authoritative artillery advice and could order their regts accordingly.

3. Depending on the needs of the battlefield situation normal artillery observers could be authorised to order massed fire against opportunity targets, anything from a single regiment to a corps artillery. Of course unauthorised observers had to request massed fire.

4. Effective fire planning methods for both 'quick' (put together in an hour or less to support a company attack) and 'deliberate' fire plans to support larger operations.

5. An effective CB organisation, comprising target acquisition (sound ranging, flash spotting, air photos), CB (and CM) staff and CB resources, typically an AGRA of several medium and a heavy regiment.

6. 8 gun btys giving the 24 gun direct support field regiment.

7. Adequate arty in general support, AGRAs, typically 5 medium regts (16 x 4.5 or 5.5) and a heavy regt (8 x 155mm guns and 8 x 7.2 inch How).

For the under-informed I suggest a visit to British Artillery in World War 2 The British arty system (also used by Canada, Aust, NZ & S Africa - not sure if the Brits managed to convince the Polish corps to do the right thing!) was without doubt the most effective artillery system, although the Soviets had a vast artillery arm and size has its own quality.

The key characteristics that made the British system best were:

1. The more senior officers of a battery were at the front with the supported arm (armour, infantry). This meant they gave orders to their batteries (not requests for fire like the US) to ensure that arty fire met the needs of the supported arm - they weren't being second guessed by someone to the rear. Captain observers, reasonably experienced officers, were also better able to establish good relationships with company and squadron commanders they were supporting and apply firepower to meet their needs. Air OPs were normally authorised to order fire to a divisional artillery. It also ensured that calls for fire got a very quick response, ie none of the 'liaison officer' nonsense.

2. Battery commanders of DS btys (majors) were with the supported battalion/regt commanders, influencing their planning to ensure the best and most appropriate use of artillery support. DS regt CO's accompanied the infantry/armd bde comd and provided authoritative artillery advice and could order their regts accordingly.

3. Depending on the needs of the battlefield situation normal artillery observers could be authorised to order massed fire against opportunity targets, anything from a single regiment to a corps artillery. Of course unauthorised observers had to request massed fire.

4. Effective fire planning methods for both 'quick' (put together in an hour or less to support a company attack) and 'deliberate' fire plans to support larger operations.

5. An effective CB organisation, comprising target acquisition (sound ranging, flash spotting, air photos), CB (and CM) staff and CB resources, typically an AGRA of several medium and a heavy regiment.

6. 8 gun btys giving the 24 gun direct support field regiment.

7. Adequate arty in general support, AGRAs, typically 5 medium regts (16 x 4.5 or 5.5) and a heavy regt (8 x 155mm guns and 8 x 7.2 inch How).


Celui-ci donne d'autres arguments en faveur des américains:

Heres why the U.S Artillery was better than any other combatant’s artillery during WW2.

Artillery Guns: guns like the M101 Howitzer and M2 155mm Long Tom were some of the most destructive guns ever to be unleashed on the battlefield. Guns like the 8 inch Howitzer and M1 240mm were also titans of artillery but were deployed in fewer numbers.

Pre-Computed Firing Data: a system that was originally taken from the British, the U.S Army took it a step further by pre-computing the firing data for a massive number of variations such as wind, temperature, barrel wear, and elevation differentials. This gave gunners an edge over enemy artillery due to having an answer for every situation.

The Tape System: For each variation of data, there was a specific tape measure detailing how to conduct fire in those conditions. An officer would go to a cabinet, pick out the tape intended for the situation at the time, and lay out the tape on the two grid points on the battlefield map. Along the tape was printed the fire and gun laying information instead of distance marks. The tape’s information would be read to the gunners, and they would fire accordingly. The system was fast, easy to read, and just as deadly accurate as the Wehrmacht’s spotted artillery. In fact, it was so incredibly easy, that an otherwise ignorant enlisted man could be walked through the procedure via radio had all his officers fell. That’s how incredibly easy and elegant the tape system was.

Time On Target (TOT)/Fire Control: due to the elegance of the Tape system, U.S batteries figured out how to get all artillery guns in range of the target, regardless of distance to target or gun caliber, to land on the target at once. This technique, invented and perfected at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, is known as Time On Target. It was the bane of German commanders existences and it made veteran and green Wehrmacht soldiers shit their pants. It was fast, it was accurate, and it turned German attacks into fields of spilled viscera and mauled bodies. Due to the nature of most of their enemies artillery doctrines, a German commander would expect that his attacks would be free of artillery for at least 15 minutes, and after that, he would be warned of a strike by the spotting rounds fired. Instead, he found that his forces would be assaulted by an extremely accurate and massed artillery barrage. By the time he would reorganize his men, a vast amount of his forces would be gone, and those who weren't were certainly running for their lives, or at the very least going on the defensive for the inevitable American counterattack that followed. In short, if it worked, the German attack would be stopped cold if not outright destroyed. It worked the vast majority of the time. The Germans were terrified and in awe of the technique and scrambled to adapt it for their own artillery doctrine which never happened. The British basically did a happy dance when they saw the carnage it could cause and employed the doctrine to their own artillery, however, they were not as accurate as American artillery.

Ammunition: America was and is a logistical colossus and crews never had to worry about ammunition. They also had specialized ammunition such as the proximity fuse, which would explode over infantry’s heads instead of landing. This put vast amounts of enemies in the grave, most of whom in pieces. The Proximity fuse was invented by the British who gave it to the U.S to manufacture, who in turn supplied it to British crews. A true game changer.

Mobility: The Americans were towing their artillery in trucks before anyone else was. Lend lease fixed this for the other Allies, I believe.

Targeting/coordination: The Americans would place their FO’s in aircraft over the battlefield. The amount of people that were not spotted by FO’s in planes was little to none. Also, unlike most armies where one FO controlled one gun, the Americans had one FO requesting fire from a large number of batteries.

This is why U.S artillery was the best in the Second World War. The Germans, while having accurate artillery, were not as fast, not as mobile (they were still using horse drawn carts to move guns) and not as powerful as U.S artillery. The Soviets were obsessed with siege guns and rocket systems like the katyushka rocket launcher, and they had whole divisions dedicated to artillery, but they were far from accurate and they tended to rely on dated Great War era tactics like oversaturating the shit out of enemy positions with arty fire. Often, the Germans would guess correctly where the Red Army would choose to hit with artillery, and retreat to positions behind the Soviets. The Soviets would end up shelling empty trenches. They were also slower than a turtle crawling through mud and tied up a lot of assets that caused thousands of unnecessary casualties. The British were closer to the US than anyone else, but were more inclined towards speed and volume of fire than accuracy. They tended to blanket an area with shells rather than zeroing in on a target. They were somewhat faster than American artillery, but they often missed the mark and were not as capable of having the same amount of devastating effects. They also relied too much on adequate terrain and weren't as flexible as american artillery. This could more or less explain the ineffective counterbattery fire the British attempted to put on German AT guns that tore apart British tank divisions in North Africa. Or it could just be Rommel. It was the height of his career, after all.

vétéran
vétéran

 
Messages: 722
Inscription: 16 Avr 2015, 14:16
Région: midi-pyrennées
Pays: france

Voir le Blog de Tomcat : cliquez ici


Re: Artillerie de la seconde guerre mondiale

Nouveau message Post Numéro: 5  Nouveau message de Loïc Charpentier  Nouveau message 12 Juil 2017, 16:41

Bonjour,

Comme d'habitude, de nos jours, ce genre de relation fait la part belle à l'artillerie des "Vainqueurs" de la Seconde Guerre Mondiale, même si elle condescend à évoquer, fugacement, la qualité de l'artillerie russe.

Dans les faits, ce sont les allemands qui avaient "bouleversifié" l'emploi de l'artillerie, en 1870, aussi bien dans son organisation que dans son emploi. La France, défaite, s'en inspirera, directement, pour réorganiser son artillerie, entre 1871 et 1914, mais, obnubilée par les prestation de son exceptionnel "75", elle avait oublié, en 1914, de s'intéresser à l'artillerie lourde. Elle se rattrapera, largement, entre 1916 et 1918. De mémoire, l'organisation de l'artillerie de l'US Army était calquée sur celle de l'artillerie française.

Jusqu'en 1914, l'artillerie allemande faisait office de référence. A dater de 1918, défaite oblige, l'artillerie française aura pignon sur rue, vu que personne, ou presque, ne daignait s'intéresser à l'artillerie soviétique.

Les allemands, à partir de 1941, avaient vite compris que les "copains d'en face" étaient loin d'être manches dans le domaine et qu'ils disposaient de pièces redoutablement efficaces, - obusiers & canons de 122 mm, obusiers de 152 mm, etc., capables de tirer dans les deux registres -, qu'ils s'étaient empressés de retourner contre leurs ex-propriétaires, quitte à devoir mettre en place des chaines de production de munitions dédiées.

La division d'artillerie, idée reprise, sans grand succès, par les allemands en 1943, trouvait son origine chez les russes, de même que les brigades d'artillerie, qu'ils constitueront, à partir de 1944.

La dotation de l'artillerie allemande, durant la seconde guerre mondiale, n'a jamais dépassé les 16 000/17 000 tubes (Beute inclus), mais son efficacité et la compétence de son encadrement n'ont pas, pour autant, été contestées. Ce n'est pas pour rien que les services de renseignements américains avaient consacré beaucoup de temps, après-guerre, à passer sur le grille les cadres emprisonnés de l'artillerie allemande.

Le volume de feu et la capacité d'aligner le plus grand nombre de pièces au kilomètre étaient, incontestablement, du domaine de l'artillerie russe, mais, dans celui de la qualité du travail et de la précision, les Allemands n'avaient rien à lui envier.

Tous les emplois évoqués dans l'extrait d'article reproduit ont été largement exploités par l'artillerie allemande, entre 1939 et 1945 et l'artillerie britannique n'a rien inventé d'innovant dans le domaine. Ça ne signifie pas, pour autant, qu'elle n'était pas efficace, mais elle n'a, jamais, inventée l'eau chaude. Par contre, en 1914, elle avait, effectivement, une longueur d'avance sur l'artillerie française, pour l'artillerie lourde, mais vu que nous n'avions quasiment rien de comparable, ce n'était pas trop difficile.

vétéran
vétéran

Avatar de l’utilisateur
 
Messages: 2423
Inscription: 25 Mai 2016, 16:26
Région: Alsace
Pays: France

Voir le Blog de Loïc Charpentier : cliquez ici


Re: Artillerie de la seconde guerre mondiale

Nouveau message Post Numéro: 6  Nouveau message de Tomcat  Nouveau message 13 Juil 2017, 11:58

D'après ce que j'ai pu lire dans différents articles et livres, l'artillerie française était assez redoutable en 1940, voire supérieure à celle allemande, malheureusement elle fut réduite assez rapidement aux silence, à chaque fois qu'elle se découvrait en faisant feu, par la Luftwaffe, par manque de DCA et d'aviation de chasse de protection.

Concernant le front de l'est, les allemands avaient la supériorité sur les russes au début du conflit en matière de précision, de mode opératoire et de contre-batterie.
Les russes ont beaucoup amélioré leur mode opératoire au cours du conflit jusqu'à égaler les allemands tout en les battant quantitativement sur le volume de feu et la capacité d'aligner le plus grand nombre de pièces au kilomètre.

Les américains et les anglais disposaient en 1944-45 d'une artillerie très efficace pour les raisons évoquées dans les précédents messages, supérieure aux allemands selon certains analystes.

vétéran
vétéran

 
Messages: 722
Inscription: 16 Avr 2015, 14:16
Région: midi-pyrennées
Pays: france

Voir le Blog de Tomcat : cliquez ici


Re: Artillerie de la seconde guerre mondiale

Nouveau message Post Numéro: 8  Nouveau message de Dog Red  Nouveau message 13 Juil 2017, 12:21

Loïc Charpentier a écrit:De mémoire, l'organisation de l'artillerie de l'US Army était calquée sur celle de l'artillerie française.


Affirmatif!

En 1917, les Sammies débarquent en France sans la moindre pièce d'artillerie. Ils vont tout acheter et se former sur place, à l'école française (comme pour les chars, d'ailleurs). Raison pour laquelle l'artillerie US est calibrée selon le système métrique avec des pièces de 75, 105 et 155 (pour les standards) héritières des canons français de la fin de la Grande Guerre.

Loïc Charpentier a écrit:La division d'artillerie, idée reprise, sans grand succès, par les allemands en 1943, trouvait son origine chez les russes, de même que les brigades d'artillerie, qu'ils constitueront, à partir de 1944.


Du peu que j'ai lu, le gigantisme des formations d'artillerie russe est la conséquence logique du succès des concentrations d'artillerie à Stalingrad.
« Les gens pensaient que je portais mes grenades telles une posture d’acteur. Ce n’était pas correct. Elles étaient purement utilitaires. Plus d’une fois en Europe et Corée, des hommes en difficulté trouvèrent le salut à coups de grenades »

General Matthew B. RIDGWAY, XVIII US Airborne Corps Commander, Ardennes 1944

modérateur
modérateur

Avatar de l’utilisateur
 
Messages: 8180
Inscription: 11 Mar 2014, 22:31
Région: Hainaut
Pays: Belgique

Voir le Blog de Dog Red : cliquez ici


Re: Artillerie de la seconde guerre mondiale

Nouveau message Post Numéro: 9  Nouveau message de Dog Red  Nouveau message 13 Juil 2017, 12:38

Je ne vais pas m'aventurer sur le terrain glissant de "la meilleure artillerie était..."

Je profite plutôt du fil pour attirer l'attention sur la fusée de proximité (Proximity Fuse) utilisée pour la première fois contre l'infanterie allemande par l'US Artillery.
C'était dans les Ardennes en décembre 1944 et avec un effet dévastateur contre les formations de Volksgrenadiere... par exemple (quoi que le caractère "dévastateur" soit fortement nuancé par certaines auteurs).

L'application de l'électronique naissante permettait au dispositif fusant de déclencher l'explosion à quelques mètres à peine avant de toucher le sol, avec un effet dispersant maximum contre l'infanterie.
Le lien ci-après (malheureusement en anglais) apporte son lot de précisions http://warfarehistorynetwork.com/daily/ ... ity-fuses/
« Les gens pensaient que je portais mes grenades telles une posture d’acteur. Ce n’était pas correct. Elles étaient purement utilitaires. Plus d’une fois en Europe et Corée, des hommes en difficulté trouvèrent le salut à coups de grenades »

General Matthew B. RIDGWAY, XVIII US Airborne Corps Commander, Ardennes 1944

modérateur
modérateur

Avatar de l’utilisateur
 
Messages: 8180
Inscription: 11 Mar 2014, 22:31
Région: Hainaut
Pays: Belgique

Voir le Blog de Dog Red : cliquez ici


Re: Artillerie de la seconde guerre mondiale

Nouveau message Post Numéro: 10  Nouveau message de Loïc Charpentier  Nouveau message 13 Juil 2017, 14:31

Le principe existait, déjà, avec la fusée fusante ou chronométrique, dont le mécanisme d'horlogerie déclenchait l'allumage de la fusée qui entrainait l'explosion du projectile après un certain temps de vol, ; durées maximales, dans l'artillerie allemande, selon le modèle et le calibre de la pièce, 30, 45, 60, 90 secondes ; les valeurs intermédiaires étaient obtenues grâce à un régloir, dans lequel on engageait la fusée d'ogive, munie d'une bague en bronze mobile - j'en ai une de 30 secondes sous les yeux :D - graduée en secondes et 1/10ème de seconde de 0,4 seconde à 26 secondes, plus la position 30 s. Les abaques de tirs indiquaient, suivant le type d'obus et la charge propulsive utilisés, le temps de vol du projectile pour atteindre la distance souhaitée. Exemple simplifié: à la Vo "moyenne" de 350 m/s, celle imprimée par un obusier de 10,5 cm, qui décroit en fonction de la distance parcourue, le projectile parcourt 3500 m en 10 s, 7000 m en 20 s, 10 500 m en 30 s - la portée maximale d'un 10,5 cm le FH 18 , sans frein de bouche, était 10 675 m -. Le temps de vol était calculé de manière à provoquer l'explosion du projectile à la distance voulue et une certaine hauteur de terrain pour favoriser la dispersion optimale des éclats.

Dans la réalité, les fusées chronométriques, seules, n'étaient utilisées, par l'artillerie allemande, que pour les obus éclairants. Pour les munitions explosives, en dehors de la seule fusée à impact, elle utilisait , systématiquement, le principe "ceinture-bretelles", en employant des fusées à double effet, chronométrique et à impact, de manière à ce que, en cas d'erreur de calcul de la distance ou du temps de vol, de modification des conditions de tir ou de dysfonctionnement de la fusée chronométrique, l'obus puisse faire son boulot, en explosant à l'impact.

Au début de la guerre de 1870, l'artillerie française n'utilisait que des fusées fusantes (en bois!), avec deux seules distances possibles - de mémoire, 1200 ou 1500m et 2500 m -, l'artillerie allemande, des fusées à impact. Les deux systèmes présentaient, chacun, leurs défauts. Avec la fusée française, l'ennemi était peinard, à moins de 1200 m, entre 1200 et 2500 m et au-delà de 2500 m! Par temps pluvieux - ce qui avait été le cas, en août 1870 - la fusée à impact allemande ne fonctionnait pas quand l'obus tombait dans un terrain trop mou!

vétéran
vétéran

Avatar de l’utilisateur
 
Messages: 2423
Inscription: 25 Mai 2016, 16:26
Région: Alsace
Pays: France

Voir le Blog de Loïc Charpentier : cliquez ici


Suivante

Retourner vers LES ARMES, VEHICULES ET MATERIELS TERRESTRES




  • SUR LE MEME THEME DANS LE FORUM ...
    Réponses
    Vus
    Dernier message
 
  ► Les 10 Derniers Posts du jour Date Auteur
    dans:  Soyons un peu chauvin en ce 21 juillet 
il y a 1 minute
par: betacam 
    dans:  Le Panther, selon l'interrogatoire d'un sous-off. allemand 
il y a 19 minutes
par: Marc_91 
    dans:  Quizz Aviation - Suite 14 
il y a 21 minutes
par: iffig 
    dans:  LE QUIZ HISTOIRE - SUITE - 18 
il y a 28 minutes
par: Lusi 
    dans:  Franco 
Aujourd’hui, 12:30
par: Prosper Vandenbroucke 
    dans:  La Wehrmacht de Fall Gelb 
Aujourd’hui, 12:02
par: Eric Denis 
    dans:  [DU 1er JUILLET 2018 au 31 AOÛT 2018]: Feu sur la guerre en Chine(Pas de photos d’atrocités svp) 
Aujourd’hui, 11:54
par: betacam 
    dans:  journal de guerre 
Aujourd’hui, 11:23
par: betacam 
    dans:  garde républicaine 
Aujourd’hui, 11:13
par: betacam 
    dans:  Une info de notre membre Renard31 
Aujourd’hui, 10:57
par: Prosper Vandenbroucke 

Qui est en ligne

Utilisateurs parcourant ce forum: Margont, Mat02 et 34 invités


Scroll